Chris Werme and Mike Boland - ERA Key Realty Services - Westborough



Posted by Chris Werme and Mike Boland on 5/5/2020

Image by pascalhelmer from Pixabay

You’ve spent months scouring home listings and viewing houses. Once you found your dream home, you signed the contracts and successfully closed. Congratulations! It’s time to get started on this next exciting chapter of your life.

While you’re probably eager to move your belongings into your new home, it’s a good idea to pause for a moment and plan to give your new house a deep cleaning. Here are five areas you’ll want to focus on before you start hauling in your possessions.

1. Bathrooms

Bathrooms are a priority because you’ll want to eliminate any potential germs lurking about. Even if everything looks clean, you can’t know for sure if it’s only been surface-cleaned, so you’ll want to give it your own deep cleaning. This way you can ensure any bacteria or other icky germs aren’t lingering. Focus on the toilet, sink, and tub. Don’t forget the toilet seat—ideally, install a new one.

Tip: Change the shower curtain and liner or, if you’re keeping the existing curtain because it matches the décor, give it a good machine wash.

2. Kitchens

Kitchens are another room where germs tend to linger. To start, clean the interiors of the oven and refrigerator. Next, use disinfectant to wash down the sink, faucet, counters, cabinets and all appliance exteriors. Don’t forget any handles and knobs.

Once you’ve got the kitchen clean, cover the cabinet and pantry shelves with new liner. Not only will it help protect your dishes and other wares, but it’ll give these spaces a fresh clean look and feel when you place your items in it.

3. Floors & Carpets

If you aren’t immediately replacing carpets, give them a deep cleaning with a rug cleaner. If you don’t own or have access to one, you can rent one from a grocery or hardware store. Wash any hardwood floors. To avoid harsh chemicals, you can use water and white vinegar, they’ll eliminate most bacteria and remove most dirt and grime.

Give the bathroom and kitchen floors additional attention by thoroughly washing these floor surfaces with a disinfecting cleaner. Be sure not to miss any nooks and crannies. Clean tile, vinyl or linoleum with a bacteria-killing cleaner and don’t forget any grout—a baking soda paste works nicely.

4. Air Filters

It’s hard to know when air filters were last changed. It’s always a good idea to replace them, just to be on the safe side. Mark the filters with the date, so you know when it’s time to swap them out again.

Tip: Don’t forget the vent filter above the stove if you have one.

5. Door Knobs

Door knobs are easy to overlook but they are a prime area for lingering germs. Go through your home and disinfect doorknobs, cabinet pulls and drawer handles. Don’t forget the handles on sliding glass or shower doors.

Tip: Use disinfectant wipes on doorknobs if you’re short on time

Once you’ve given your house a deep cleaning, you can confidently move your possessions into your home with a fresh, clean start.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Chris Werme and Mike Boland on 2/5/2019

It's imperative that you clean up your home appropriately whenever a member of your household has had the flu to prevent other members of the house from getting sick too. Not just that, a germ-free home also provides some form of protection for everyone. To clean thoroughly, you will need cleaning supplies like disinfectant and sanitizing solutions. You may either decide to make your own at home or purchase one from the store, but remember not to mix disinfectant with any other cleaning products to prevent the rise of toxic fumes. 

Cleaning The Bedroom

It’s very likely that the sick individual spent a lot of time in the bedroom, so this is one of the first places to which you should attend. Remove all bedding entirely and throw it in the washing machine, under the highest setting as they’ve usually had the closest contact with the body. The mattress should also be aired out to get rid of sweat stains and odors.

Cleaning The Bathroom

Using a disinfectant, wipe down your entire bathroom including the bathtub, toilet handles, sink and shower handles, door knobs, light switches, and any other commonly shared areas. Do this regularly throughout the period of the illness and after. You should also switch out the hand towel every day or have designated paper towels for everyone. Everyone's toothbrushes should be sanitized in a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water, but discard that of the convalescent should.

Cleaning The Living Areas

It's very advisable that you cover all your furniture and upholstery with washable blankets during the sickness time, to prevent cross-contamination. Otherwise, you might be dealing with more germs than you thought. Wipe down the living room area such as the floors, chair and sofas, side stools, phones, remote controls, board games and any other thing that has been in contact with the sick person.

Cleaning Other Parts of the House

Also disinfect the parts of the house that you don’t pay much attention to on a regular basis such as the handrails, doorknobs, computers and video game consoles, light switches, etc. If the sick individual spent much time in the kitchen, disinfect it thoroughly. Kitchen utensils and plates used by the individual should always be washed at the highest setting of the dishwasher or disinfected when washing by hand. 

Keeping your home germ free at such a time like this might seem like lots of work so soon after an illness, but the rewards are definitely worth it. Ask your real estate professional for a housecleaning referral if you don't want to do it yourself.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Chris Werme and Mike Boland on 4/4/2017

Keeping your home clean shows that you care about where you live. Despite your best efforts,without realizing it, while doing deep cleanings, you may use household cleaners that could be hazardous to your health. Many of these products have safety labels on them. You could save yourself and your family a visit to an emergency room simply by reading and following the usage directions on the container.

Clean your home safely

Other household cleaners may be products that you have used for years. The cleaners may have been used in your family for generations. But, that doesn’t mean that the products are always safe. In fact, hazards associated with products that you may use while cleaning your home range from minor to acute.

  • Acidic products and bleaches should be used while wearing gloves. Household cleaners made with corrosive chemicals should also be used while wearing gloves.
  • Bleach based household cleaners can be harmful to young lungs and skin. Open windows when using these products. Leave the room and get some fresh air if you start to feel congested or a burning sensation in your eyes or lungs.
  • Strong fragrances or scents in household cleaning products can irritate your respiratory system. Companies that make cleaning products don’t always reveal all the chemicals in their products. Pay attention to how you feel when using certain household products. Stop using products if you start to feel ill.
  • Products that contain chemicals like nitrites,carcinogens and diethanolamines could take years to show their effects. However,long term effects of these cleaners could help to create acute or chronic illnesses.
  • Steel scrubbers can chip, cut and damage your hands. Wear gloves when scrubbing with steel scrubs. Change the gloves if the scrubs start to tear the gloves. To protect your hands, also toss steel scrubs in the trash when the scrubs start to break down. Hard cleaning agents can speed up the breakdown of steel scrubs.

Plant based household cleaning products may be safer. Avoid mixing cleaners as a chemical in one cleaner could become toxic if combined with a chemical in another cleaner. As often as it is said, it is worth repeating – keep household cleaners (even if you deem them to be safe) out of the reach of children.

Teach children not to open the tops on products. Also, ensure cleaners that you bring into your home have a childproof cap or seal on them. When using cleaners, wipe appliances, counter tops and other areas dry before leaving the area. You may even decide to do heavy cleanings while your children are visiting relatives or outside playing.

Fresh scents can masks corrosive and other harmful chemicals in household cleaners. Before using products, including household cleaners that you’ve used for years, read safety warnings on the labeling. Open doors and windows as needed and take breaks between cleanings to avoid inhaling too much of any cleaner at once.Consult your physician if you or your child becomes ill after coming into contact with a household cleaner.





Posted by Chris Werme and Mike Boland on 12/9/2014

Germs are everywhere. You may be surprised to know they are even lurking in your home. Where are the germiest places in the home? How can you protect your family from germs and bacteria? Here is a list of germ-laden places all around your home: Kitchen Sink Even the kitchen sink is germ laden. Think about all the food and dirt that goes down the drain. Believe it or not kitchen sinks are actually germier than toilet seats. The best way to keep your kitchen sink germ free is to use a bleach-based cleaner. You can also scrub your sink with a mild soap. White vinegar can be used to sanitize the sink and remove any stubborn stains or spots. Kitchen Sponge Not far from your kitchen sink is the kitchen sponge. Sponges are used to wipe up spills and messes and make a perfect breeding ground for bacteria and germs. Make sure to disinfect your sponge by tossing it in the dishwasher, or microwave a wet sponge for 1-2 minutes. Bed sheets This may give you the creepy crawlies but all the germs you come in contact with all day long end up in your bed. Your bed sheets are covered in sweat, skin, and bacteria from your body.  Wash your sheets about once a week in warm or hot water with a regular detergent. Wall-to-wall carpet Wall-to-wall carpet can be a trap for millions of germs and allergens.  Wall-to-wall carpets are full of pet dander, germs from dirty shoes, and mold.  The best way to clean Wall-to-wall carpeting is to use a vacuum with a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter.







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